Foodie Friday: exploring priorities

I’ve been thinking about priorities a lot this week, as it has become apparent that I don’t really make any. This came to light after writing last Sunday’s belated Foodie Friday post. I sat down for dinner with Johann, chef of the day, and he asked how the writing was going. I grumbled that it was almost finished, but I was feeling frustrated that I’d spent a couple of hours on it and so didn’t get other things done that I wanted to. As I explained this, it dawned on me how ridiculous a thought that is. I had just achieved a task I wasn’t sure I’d manage, and all I could think of, instantly, was everything else I hadn’t yet done. Change is needed.

Johann explained the radical idea of priorities to me. That you can set yourself the single, most important goal, and then work out if everything else you want to do works towards it or not. And prioritise the activities that lead to the goal. Crucially, the second step is to get rid of the guilt over not doing anything or doing the ‘wrong’ things.

Musing on this is helpful to me, and the concept has overlapped with our thoughts about food this week too. We went to see a brilliant documentary called A Quest For Meaning last week, in which two French men go on a journey to find out how to live. Ok, that summation makes it sound a bit terrible, but it covered some really cool ground, they spoke to some very inspirational figures and it had an impact on us.

One super cool amazing person I need to research more is Vandana Shiva. She said something that’s rattled round my mind ever since: that we can buy cheap food, but we are not paying the true cost. I take this to mean: the true cost of industrial agriculture is paid by the earth, and by workers, and with our health. Someone, or something, else is paying for our choices while we save money.

This made us revisit what I vowed in a previous post: that we are saving money by buying cheap low quality food now, in order to make a difference later. Reconsidering this means deciding to begin to stop shifting the cost and responsibility, and start prioritising organic, local food. I begin to think we have a responsibility to accept nothing less than good quality organic food, and to see cheap meat, cheap dairy, cheap, processed anything as unacceptable. Surely we can find other areas to economise in (I think of my trips to the ice cream shop and gulp in fear).

So, this week we have bought some dried organic kidney beans, chickpeas, lentils, some organic versions of things we already buy. It’s by no means a total transformation, we are rather dipping our toes in and changing a few products at a time. But it feels good to decide that good food is a priority now, not later.

In the spirit of priorities I am also writing this in my lunch break at work, which accounts for any dodgy sentences I haven’t had time to proof. I’ve worked all week, we have family and friends visiting today – hooray! So I know this is my only time, and I want to stick writing, so I am trying to take little snippets of time.

Priorities also means today making fresh pizzas for all the staff at work. Such a good Friday tradition, that stretches my ability to coordinate all my other jobs but is so worth the effort.

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Time to go back and roll out some dough. Maybe next week I’ll have time for some drawing and a proper review of something food related! Happy weekend.

Foodie Fridays: okay, it’s Sunday, but here’s a catch up anyway

Typically, the week I spend completely immersed in food (not literally, or perhaps I wouldn’t still have the job) is the week I don’t manage to get fingers to keyboard to write about it. So here is a compensatory, quick little jotting of thoughts. It was my training week at my new job in the kitchen of a lovely cafe here in Reykjavik. I’ve been learning recipes, tasting, adjusting, tasting again. I’m used to cooking for just friends and family so it’s been cool to scale up and learn how to prepare large amounts of things. I’ve worked as a kitchen assistant before, in summer as a student, but this job’s a little different, it’s a one person kitchen – for two branches of the coffee shop! So it’s a really interesting challenge for me.

I’ve spent a couple of years growing food, first on a little allotment, then working at a herb farm, then as a long-term wwoof volunteer in the UK. When I came to Iceland, I considered finding work as a gardener: but after some pondering realised that I’d rather like to follow my passion for good food, rather than end up gardening commercially with only ornamental plants, and non-organically. I want to experience the other end of the food chain! To be in between producer and consumer. I have a feeling running the kitchen will inform my future food growing, and be a great opportunity to develop new skills.

As it turned out, I am super lucky to be working at a really great company. Everyone has been friendly and welcoming, and everything I learned to make was delicious. Fresh hummus, pesto, tuna salad…almond and coconut milk from scratch…toasted granola mixes…tip top spiced chai. I have enjoyed the variety of processes, and the focus of my week has really been getting my head around multi-tasking. Cooking dinner for me and Johann is a relaxed process, where I can usually just focus on one thing at a time. Preparing food at work means making the best use of time, which has often meant working on a couple of dishes at once. On quieter days I was able to plod through my to-do list one at a time – maybe four tuna, two hummus. Simple. But some days it’s necessary to get one thing going first, then hop in between various stages of the process, getting other things done too. That really taxes my mind and will be a skill to develop!

Often while I was stirring the chai and inhaling the spicy aroma, or zesting lemons, or getting a waft of toasted maple syrup as I took the granola out of the oven, I would catch myself and think happily, ‘hey! this is WORK!’ because it felt like play. I enjoy cooking. My learning curve next week will be being in charge of my time, having to decide what to make when, and co-ordinating everything. The time I spent in Calais co-ordinating the packing of food parcels has given me some confidence in organisation, and although undoubtedly it sometimes feels strange to be preparing gourmet breakfasts, not bags of tins for hungry people, I think to myself that this is part of my journey towards helping other people again sometime in the future. This is time that I am allowed to take for myself, to recover financially by working full-time, and also recover mentally, by doing something that I enjoy and that has a lower stress factor. Actually, in the past I’d have been a little furious ball of stress having to organise the volume of food needed for our busy cafes, now I feel it’s a do-able task – after all, there aren’t 10,000 customers. And I understand a little more the kind of attitude that gets things done: it’s not the hare-brained worrier! So I try to cultivate the confidence, and savour the enjoyment, and remember to be grateful.

So, just a small post to make up for missing Friday. My other challenge coming up is keeping up writing and posting here twice a week , which has been really easy whilst not working, but harder to stick to after an 8 hour shift! I’m going to have to accept that not every post can be a 1000 word opinion piece…actually, maybe that’s a good thing. Let’s see how it goes.